It’s been a busy August at Arizona Pain while we stay hot on the trail of the latest pain news, research, and lifestyle tips to make this blog your go-to destination for information and inspiration. Here’s what we discussed over during August.

Guess which gender experiences more pain

We kicked the month off with an article exploring why women seem to be more susceptible to pain than men. Women are affected by disorders like fibromyalgia in disproportionate numbers, and scientists aren’t sure why.

It’s an emerging area of research. Right now, experts have more questions than answers, but they’re coming out with new hints all the time. The answers aren’t always clear, but they’re important because of the implications for treating pain.

Why did the boy eat his homework?

After you’ve perused this month’s first story, think about your favorite knock-knock joke and don’t be afraid to laugh out loud. An increasing body of research points to laughter as one of mankind’s greatest coping mechanisms for managing pain.

Turns out, laughter has unique biological mechanisms that set off healthy chain reactions in the body, some of which are similar to exercise. The post also offers a key tip to make sure you’re getting the most out of your laughter.

And do you know why the boy ate his homework? Because the teacher told him it was a piece of cake.

Work outlook improves for disabled

On a more serious, but still happy note, new reports show that people with disabilities are having an easier time fitting into today’s workforce. Experts say technology has eased entry for many people, helping them to work at home and creating new fields that welcome the many gifts people with disabilities have to share.

August’s article reveals how not all is perfect in the push for equal employment rights, but efforts have come a long way since before the days of federal disability protections. We’ve also found one cutting-edge sector that’s taking extra steps to recruit people with disabilities into the field.

Tips for staying cool and comfortable this summer

The dog days of summer have arrived and with that, we gathered some helpful tips to make it through the soaring temperatures while minimizing chronic pain. Summer is full of temptation between ice cream trucks and Sunday barbecues calling your name, but we’ve made it easy to stay healthy and comfortable during this last stretch of heat.

Headed on one last summer road trip? We’ve got tips for that, too. Bon voyage!

Creating community

Managing chronic pain can be an incredibly isolating experience, and that’s why we’ve created several initiatives to help people with pain connect. Studies show that creating connection and sharing experiences helps to improve mood, which helps to reduce pain.

This month, you’ll read about our Faces of Pain project over on our partner site, PainDoctor.com, where people just like you are posting their pictures and sharing how they stay inspired, along with their dreams and goals for the future. If you like what you see, we invite you to contribute your own story and join the movement.

You’ll also learn about the many people connecting through our virtual support group, which offers 24/7, free connectivity to people just like you.

Speed counts

As experienced pain doctors, we’ve unfortunately seen many patients who have waited far too long to get the treatment they need. And new research about spinal cord stimulation shows that delay can have a dramatic impact on the effectiveness of the treatment.

The study illuminates why many patients experience treatment delays in the first place. Don’t miss this story to learn why some people waited up to five years for that all-important referral. You’ll also learn the details about this interesting treatment technique that has helped many people reduce their pain.

How to get your om on

A lot of people have heard about yoga, or maybe they know someone who has tried it. We’ve gotten a lot of questions about how to access this ancient practice, so the August blog posts feature plenty of content answering your burning questions.

Whether you’re an expectant mother wanting to try yoga to relieve stress and anxiety—hint, it works!—or looking for a good studio in the Phoenix area, we’ve got you covered.

There’s also been a lot of research about the benefits of yoga for breast cancer survivors, and we dig into the details about that. If you’re a survivor who experiences lingering fatigue or emotional difficulties, definitely read our report and see if yoga might help you feel better.

Improving patient access to care

Technology continues to upend traditional ways of practicing medicine, and telemedicine is one of the emerging phenomena. Read how some primary care doctors are working to reduce the number of opioids they prescribe by reaching out to pain specialists through telemedicine.

This virtual style of medicine has also been shown to improve patient outcomes and expand access, especially for patients living in rural or medically underserved areas.

This trend is a quickly growing one. Read our report so you can stay up-to-date.

Advances in stem cell research

Stem cell treatments offer great promise, and the research surrounding this exciting field of medicine is accumulating at a rapid rate. With that in mind, we devoted a significant amount of space in August to the latest news in this emerging therapy.

You’ll learn the basics of what stem cells are and how they hold the key to harnessing the body’s innate powers of healing. You’ll also learn how this therapy could save thousands of people’s lives through regenerating donor organs, and how that knowledge could ultimately help chronic pain patients improve their own quality of life.

We hope you enjoy this month’s series of posts, and you read things that inform, enlighten, or entertain you. If you have any questions about the posts, or about the treatments mentioned, don’t hesitate to contact us.

What is your favorite article during August on Arizona Pain?

Image by N i c o l a via Flickr

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